Canvas Studio Online Video Learning Platform (Formerly ARC)

Studio Logo

Studio is a video tool integrated inside of Canvas, which MiraCosta began piloting in spring 2019 when it was known as ARC. It is available to all faculty and students.

With Studio:

  • Faculty and students can easily record webcam and screencast video within Canvas
  • Faculty and students can create and manage a library of videos for use in Canvas (and to share outside of Canvas)
  • Faculty can create discussion activities that are based on video (discussion comments are tied to specific points in the video)
  • Faculty get data on student viewing of video
  • Faculty can add quiz questions into videos; students respond while watching the video; results go directly into the gradebook
  • Students can submit video assignments; faculty can provide feedback directly on specific moments in the video
  • Videos can be automatically captioned and the captions can be easily edited

Studio is available to faculty and students from the blue global navigation bar in MiraCosta Canvas.

Studio is also available to faculty only on the navigation menu within a MiraCosta Canvas course to RECORD or ADD video content.

Studio is also available to faculty only on the navigation menu within a Canvas course to RECORD or ADD video content.

Within the Canvas Rich Content Editor, faculty and students can select Studio from the second row of icons to create webcam or screencast video.

Studio location in Canvas Rich Content Editor.

Helpful Guides

Key Studio tutorials/videos to get you started:

To learn more about Studio and Canvas, view the full set of Studio tutorials.

Adding Videos Captioned in YouTube or 3CMediaSolutions to Studio

Unfortunately, videos you’ve already created in YouTube or 3CMediaSolutions will not have their captions preserved when you add them to Studio. Rather than starting captioning over again in Studio, here are some tips from Greg Beyrer of Cosumnes River College:

YouTube: Download the captions file from YouTube. The video must be set to allow community members to contribute captions. If the video already has English captions provided by the creator those cannot be downloaded, but you can tell YouTube you are contributing captions in a friendly language, say Canadian English, and then one-click copy the published captions to the new language. That could then be downloaded. YouTube does not download captions in a file that is recognized by Studio, so you have to convert those captions (.sbv file) into a Studio-friendly format (.srt file). This site does this: https://captionsconverter.com. (from YouTube Captions to Arc – Workaround Guide, where you can also find a video demonstrating the process.)

3CMediaSolutions: Simply download the (.vtt) caption file from a 3CMediaSolutions video, and then upload that file into Studio for the same video. If your video is lengthy, it may even be quicker to first upload it to 3CMediaSolutions and request the free professional captioning rather than going through the auto-caption and edit process in Studio. (from Making Arc Work with 3C Media Solutions, which includes a video demonstrating the process)

Proctorio

Proctorio

Proctorio is an online exam proctoring and security tool. It is available for use in Canvas courses by instructor request. Proctorio requires both instructors and students to access Canvas using the Google Chrome browser. As of fall 2018, it works with Canvas Quizzes but not Quizzes.Next. Its primary features are:

  1. Locking down the student’s computer when tests are being taken in Canvas so that the student must stay in Canvas and is unable to switch to other websites or programs.
  2. Recording the video and sound (requires student to have a webcam/mic) during test-taking in Canvas; the recording is automatically analyzed for anomalies that could indicate cheating behaviors; anomalies are flagged for review by the instructor.

Feature #1 can be used on its own, if the video-based proctoring is not desired.

You may also be interested in tips on designing “less cheatable” courses and assessments.

Getting Started with Proctorio

  • To use Proctorio in Canvas, you (and your students, when completing assessments that integrate Proctorio) MUST use the Google Chrome browser with the Proctorio extension.
  • To obtain the MCC version of the Proctorio extension for Chrome, instructors must contact Karen Turpin and/or Jim Julius. (Students will be informed how to install the extension on their personal computers once the instructor has added Proctorio to their course. MiraCosta computer labs already have the Proctorio extension enabled in Chrome.)
  • Once you have installed the Proctorio extension in Chrome, in Canvas you will see a message at the top of the screen the first time you access each course you are teaching. The message asks you if you want to use Canvas with that course.
    • If you do activate Proctorio within a course, you will also be asked if you wish to add some Proctorio resources to your course (practice quiz, student guide added in the Pages area). A faculty guide will be added in the Pages area and it will automatically open.

Helpful Resources

  • Proctorio FAQs
  • Proctorio Guide produced by the Online Education Initiative with an overview of Proctorio’s options and settings.
  • Additional step-by-step guides become available to you and your students after you activate Proctorio within a Canvas course. See above for details on how to do that.

Getting Help

Proctorio email support: support@proctorio.com

Proctorio phone support:
Faculty – 1-760-209-1110 or 1-855-407-1393
Students – 1-760-227-7129 or 1-855-530-0985

Also, once the Proctorio extension (Secure Exam Proctor) is installed in Chrome, it becomes active for faculty and students when they access a Proctorio-enabled quiz in Canvas. Clicking the shield that represents the extension provides access to live chat support and to the Proctorio support website with additional resources.

Proctorio Feedback and Tips

Proctorio has been available via the OEI to CCC schools since 2015. Some highlights of feedback from colleagues around the CCC system:

  • Some colleges are using Proctorio extensively and seem happy with it; others have run into some concerns and have chosen not to promote its use.
  • The biggest concerns about using Proctorio are:
    • Challenges for students in ensuring that they have a proper setup (using Chrome, getting the Proctorio extension installed, using a webcam and microphone if proctoring is required)
    • Challenges for students with Proctorio working properly for video proctoring if they don’t have a strong Internet connection; this can result in the computer freezing and/or exam failures.
  • There are some colleges where they say that due to the above concerns, some faculty are using just the Lockdown capability of Proctorio and not the video proctoring, meaning that students don’t have to have a webcam and mic, and the bandwidth requirements are much less.
  • The practice quiz that Proctorio will automatically add to your course is useful as a way to help ensure that students are prepared to take a real test with Proctorio, but …
  • If you decide to not use the “full” capabilities of Proctorio, but you do want to use the practice quiz that Proctorio installs in your course, you should modify the practice quiz settings to reflect only the Proctorio features you are using.
  • It’s a good idea to include the Proctorio support numbers for students (see above) in any quiz/exam directions in case they haven’t even realized they need to be using Chrome and/or they have not yet installed the Proctorio extension within Chrome.
  • At least one college recommends against enabling the Record the Room option (awkward and disruptive during exam-taking) and the Force Completion option (will require instructor intervention to reset the test if there is any Internet connection issue during the test).
  • Students cannot use a mobile device to complete a Proctorio-enabled Quiz.
  • As of fall 2018, Proctorio works with Quizzes only, not Quizzes.Next .

 

 

New Quizzes (aka Quizzes.Next) in Canvas

Quizzes.Next was the original name given to Canvas’s alternative quiz/test assessment engine introduced in 2018. As of summer 2019, Canvas has begun referring to this tool as “New Quizzes.” Although originally it was expected that Quizzes.Next would completely replace the original Quiz tool by early 2019, it is no longer clear when this might happen.

Teachers can use Quizzes.Next to create assessments using a variety of question types, including some unavailable in the original Quiz tool. Quizzes.Next assessments are a particular type of Assignment rather than a distinct tool.

Locate New Quizzes in Canvas

  1. Click Assignments in the Canvas course menu
  2. Click the +Quiz/Test button near the top right of the screen.

Quizzes.Next

Getting Started with Quizzes.Next

FAQs and Known Issues

As of summer 2018, Quizzes.Next is in Beta. You may find a few issues as you begin to work with this tool. Check the FAQ and Known Issues, and contact Canvas Support to report issues and get help.

 

Academic Integrity and Canvas Exams

Though cheating is certainly not unique to the online environment, many instructors have  reasonable concerns about opportunities for students to cheat online. These concerns may include:

  • inappropriate access to resources when completing an online assessment
  • copying answers or text found online
  • sharing answers with other students
  • contracting with a third party to complete online classwork

There are many approaches to decreasing the likelihood or ability for students to cheat in the online environment.

Course Redesign: Consider combining or replacing objective tests with other methods of assessment, such as projects, collaborative work, writing assignments, and personal reflections. Multiple choice and essay questions requiring application of skills and knowledge rather than simple factual recall are harder to cheat on. Consider designing tests as open note/open resource so that you do not get caught in an “arms race” with students. Consider requiring students to turn in drafts of projects and written work (for feedback from instructor and/or peers) well in advance of a final due date. Alter assignments and tests from semester to semester. Consider including more formative assessments and activities, and making high-stakes objective assessment a smaller portion of the overall course grade.

Proctoring: For objective assessments critical to the learning outcomes for an online course, consider using the MiraCosta Proctoring Center. For students at a distance, the Proctoring Center can help to establish proctoring in other locations. You may also consider the use of an online proctoring technology; Proctorio is available to MiraCosta faculty for this purpose.

Code of Conduct and Instructor Leadership: Discuss with students the reasons why academic integrity is important. Emphasize the benefits (and pleasures!) of truly engaging with course material and learning, rather than focusing on grades. Have students sign or even jointly develop a statement summarizing the expectations and requirements for academic honesty. Include a question on exams that has students agree to the code of conduct and/or that has students indicate that they have completed the exam on their own without using prohibited resources.

Making Canvas Exams More Secure

When conducting tests through Canvas, the following methods can further reduce the risk of cheating. Note that as of fall 2018, Canvas has two different tools for conducting tests – Quizzes (the original) and Quizzes.Next. Quizzes.Next is still being developed; at this time it has both advantages and limitations (view a comparison and/or a Quizzes.Next FAQ) compared to the original Quizzes tool, but it is expected to eventually fully replace Quizzes. Canvas guides for both Quizzes and Quizzes.Next are given for each item below as applicable.

  • Availability Window – Restrict the availability of the test to a specific date/time range. Quizzes | Quizzes.Next
  • Time Limits – Limit the time a student can spend on a test once they start it. Quizzes | Quizzes.Next
  • Disallow Multiple Attempts – Multiple attempts is a great option for a “mastery” quiz where you want students to retake it until they achieve a certain level of proficiency; this isn’t typical of a summative, high-stakes assessment. Quizzes | Quizzes.Next
  • Delay Per-Question Feedback (Quizzes only) – Providing students feedback on each question can help them learn; delaying the availability of this feedback until after the test availability window is over can help ensure the integrity of the exam. Quizzes [As of fall 2018, if feedback is built into a Quizzes.Next assessment, it is provided to students immediately and cannot be delayed.]
  • Answer Randomization – Answers to multiple choice questions can be randomized/shuffled so they are presented differently for different students. (Note: In Quizzes this is one setting for the entire quiz; in Quizzes.Next this is a per-question setting.) Quizzes | Quizzes.Next
  • Present Questions One at a Time – This can make it more difficult for students to “collaborate” if questions are also randomized. An additional option can prevent students from going back to previous questions, which can further strengthen the integrity of the exam, but can also frustrate students who legitimately realize they made a mistake on a previous question and wish to correct it. Quizzes | Quizzes.Next
  • Shuffle Questions (Quizzes.Next only) – This will present the quiz questions to students in random order. Quizzes.Next
  • Question Randomization with a Question Group/Item Bank – Drawing questions randomly from a pool (or pools) can make it even more difficult for students to productively share questions during an exam. Keep in mind that if your pool contains more questions than the number of questions you are drawing from the pool to go into the exam, you need to be careful about maintaining consistency of the questions within the pool (both in terms of outcomes measured and difficulty of the questions). Quizzes | Quizzes.Next
  • Calculated (Formula) Questions – Formula questions can include a range of values for one term/variable. Thus, the same question will have unique answers across different quizzes, but the question can still be auto-graded. Quizzes | Quizzes.Next
  • Require Presentation of ID – if you are not using a physical proctoring center, but you would like students to demonstrate that the person taking the test is the person enrolled in your class, one suggestion is to have students record a brief video holding a picture ID next to their face. If you use Proctorio, this step can automatically be included when enabling video proctoring; if you don’t, you could add an Essay question that directs students to access their webcam through the Rich Content Editor and record this. Of course, this requires students to have a webcam (and still wouldn’t prevent the student from doing this, then having someone else complete the rest of the exam). Quizzes | Quizzes.Next
  • Restrict Computer Activity During Exam – Technology such as Proctorio enables faculty to require that student’s computer and browser are “locked down” during an exam, preventing students from opening other browser windows or applications, taking screen captures, etc. This requires specific technology on the student computer. Note that Proctorio as of fall 2018 works only with Canvas Quizzes, not Quizzes.Next.