Canvas Student Annotation Submission Assignment

The student annotation assignment allows the teacher to upload a file to Canvas that the student can then, without leaving Canvas, mark up using the built-in annotation tools (highlight, make comments, draw marks, etc.) as their submission.

See the end of this page for some ideas for how you might use this feature.

Screencast Video

Canvas has published a one minute overview video of the new feature.

Overview/How to Use

  1. Create an assignment as normal.
  2. For the assignment type, choose Online.
  3. Under online entry options, check student annotation.
  4. Choose an existing file (such as a PDF, Word document, or JPG), or upload a new one, that will be the template for the annotation assignment.
  5. Finish completing your assignment with the normal process.

Limitations

  • Annotation assignments use the same annotation tools available to teachers with SpeedGrader. While a variety of file types are supported, PDF or Word files will have the best compatibility. Here is a list of file types the DocViewer can preview.
  • These assignments are not currently available for use with with peer assessment, but this is planned for the future.
  • This type of assignment cannot be made a group assignment. (For these, consider using a full collaboration tool, like Office 365.)
  • This is not a multi-user live collaborative document (like Office 365, Google Documents, etc.).
  • Keep in mind that most students do not have a stylus for detail drawing, and drawing with a mouse is imprecise at best.
  • All annotations exist as a layer in Canvas displayed over top the original; it is not actually editing the original document. You can export the annotations to a PDF file, where the annotations will exist on the PDF comment layer.

Student Directions

Student Guide: How do I annotate a file as an assignment submission in Canvas?

Assignment Ideas

Here are some ideas to get you thinking about how you might use this new tool in your course. Do note that many of these are possible to do in other ways (like using Office 365 documents). The tool in Canvas can make some of these quicker or easier, but, in some cases, it may be appropriate to continue to use the other tools.

  • Have students analyze, critique, or respond to prompts (texts, images, or both).
  • Train academic paper reading skills. Reading academic papers can be challenging to read and learn from without training. Upload a paper (either relevant to this course, or perhaps in a similar field, but not exactly related to this course) and ask the students to read it. Have them use the annotation tools to highlight passages they consider important, make margin notes for questions that remain or their thoughts at that moment of reading, or to make commentary about the structure, flow, and formatting of the paper.
  • You can provide feedback on important information the student did not take notes on, extraneous highlighting, and other details.
  • Ask for self-reflection and/or start a class discussion of errors in papers. Use a sample assignment submission like students might hand in and ask them to mark it up. Optionally, you can include a rubric in the template document for the students to fill in. This will allow you to have a discussion with them about the feedback that they find most important. This can also help them to review their own submissions before submitting.
  • Post a “find errors and correct them” assignment. Especially useful for a language or coding course (but also can apply to others, like math or logic), create an assignment of statements or solutions that have errors in them, and ask students to mark up what the error is, and suggest corrections. Do keep in mind the limitations of annotations as small corrections; do not have problems that require a significant rework. “True or False, but, if false, make it true” assignments are a narrower sub-type of this activity.
  • Ask students to label a diagram or image as their submission. The student can use point comment tools to label individual parts, or box comments for larger structures that cover an area. This is comparable to a “hot spot” question in some ways. This is only recommended for identifying parts of a diagram, image or document; other assignment types are better for whole image identification. This can be used not only for low-level identification (“label the parts of this building’s façade and attribute it to a period”), but also higher-level analysis (“discuss your interpretation of this x-ray”).
  • Collect student feedback in a specific format, such as providing a form or template that you would like students to fill in for a “360 degree” peer evaluation after a group assignment, but you do not want students to need to download or upload files (and a survey is too much for what is needed).
  • Fill out “lab notebook” or “observation notebook” documents in a course that does not make heavy use of them to utilize another tool specialized to that purpose.

Turnitin LTI 2.0 Canvas Plagiarism Framework

Turnitin 2.0 is available within Canvas and offers a tighter integration between a Canvas assignment and Turnitin than the Turnitin 1.0 “classic” LTI Canvas integration. No separate login or password is required for faculty or students.

The primary difference between the two tools is that the “Classic” (1.0) Turnitin integration is best used if faculty prefer to use Turnitin for grading and feedback; the Turnitin 2.0 Framework is preferred by faculty who want Turnitin for plagiarism prevention but like to use the Canvas grading and feedback tools.

MiraCosta College has an unlimited license to Turnitin, GradeMark, and Peer Review.

Turnitin LTI 2.0 Canvas Plagiarism Framework

Turnitin LTI 2.0 Resources

Testing a Turnitin Assignment with your MCC Sample Student

Turnitin is an LTI tool that is globally installed on our Canvas system. LTI tools are not native to Canvas so they will not work in the internal Canvas Student View. You must log off of Canvas, as an instructor, then log on with your MCC Sample Student account. Now you will be able to experience a Turnitin assignment within your Canvas course as a student.

Additional information

Turnitin for Canvas (Classic Turnitin LTI 1.0 Version)

MiraCosta College has an unlimited license to Turnitin, GradeMark, and Peer Review, and  Turnitin is available within Canvas. No separate login or password is required for faculty or students.

As of August 2019, Turnitin indicates that both the “classic” and the newer Turnitin LTI 2.0 Canvas Plagiarism Framework methods for using Turnitin with Canvas will be supported indefinitely. The primary difference between the two tools is that the “Classic” (1.0) Turnitin integration is best used if faculty prefer to use Turnitin for grading and feedback; the Turnitin 2.0 Framework is preferred by faculty who want Turnitin for plagiarism prevention but like to use the Canvas grading and feedback tools.

Classic Turnitin LTI 1.0 in Canvas

Testing a Turnitin Assignment with your MCC Sample Student

Turnitin is an LTI tool that is globally installed on our Canvas system. LTI tools are not native to Canvas so they will not work in the internal Canvas Student View. You must log off of Canvas, as an instructor, then log on with your MCC Sample Student account. Now you will be able to experience a Turnitin assignment within your Canvas course as a student.

Additional information

Submit Handwritten Work to Canvas using Camscanner App and a Phone

CamScanner allows students to use their phone to scan multiple pages of handwritten homework to a PDF to submit to an online course. The app is available for Android, iPhone, and iPad. The basic version is free and should be sufficient for students to scan multiple pages to one file that can be submitted to a Canvas assignment.

Camscanner App Tutorials for Canvas

Android

iPhone (iOS)

What are the different assignment submission types in Canvas?

As the instructor, you can decide what kinds of submissions are acceptable. You may allow students to:

  • No Submission: Assignments can be created that have No Submission. These work well for in-class presentations, daily participation points, or other optional activities used for extra credit. This is the only way to create an “ad-hoc” column in the gradebook.
  • Online Submission: Assignments can be created that have Online Submissions. Students can submit work in the form of file or image uploads, URLs, text entry, GoogleDocs, or audio or video recordings or uploads. You may allow one, several or all of these options for student assignment submissions.
  • Upload a File: For example, this would be used to submit a Microsoft Word file. Instructors can also limit the file types (i.e. .docx or .doc) that will be accepted for submission. If these file types limitations are set for an assignment, students will only be able to submit the allowed file types.
  • Submit a Text Entry: This assignment must be typed directly into the LMS, no file attachments can be submitted. It is strongly recommended that you type the assignment in Microsoft Word first and save it to your computer. For example, this would be used to submit text for a Journal Assignment entry.
  • Enter a Website URL: For example, this would be used when students are required to upload a video to YouTube and submit a link to it for the instructor to review.
  • Submit Media for an Assignment: For example, this option would be used when students are required to record a short video of themselves.
  • Submit a Google Doc for an Assignment: This assignment must be submitted as a Google Doc. For example, this option would be used when students are required to collaborate on a paper using the Collaboration tool and Google Docs.
  • On Paper: Assignments can also be delivered to the instructor On Paper. On Paper Assignments are usually evaluated by hand and grades are manually entered in the Gradebook.

Other Options:

  • Group Assignment: You can assign work to a Group Set for an assignment.
  • Peer Reviews: You can require students to review each other’s work.

More information on assignments and step-by-step instructions can be found in the Canvas Guides for Instructors by Instructure.